• Embrace TFC

Social Workers are Everyone's Hero

Updated: Apr 29

Case managers have difficult, but incredibly rewarding careers. These individuals work with children in our community that face challenging circumstances, and guide them in finding the stability and tools to help them cope with their trauma. Without our case managers, Embrace would not be able to impact children in such a profound way. We sat down with case managers across the state and asked them why they chose this line of work and what keeps them going.



Cindy Avvenire - Winchester, VA



What made you decide to become a case manager and work with children in foster care? I have spent my entire career working with children in daycare, school, DSS, and in-home therapy situations. I also worked with older foster youth in a previous job as a community college counselor. During all this, I realized that I could make a positive impact on the lives of kids by helping them be safe and get the services they need.

What is the most rewarding part of your job? The most rewarding part of my job is seeing happy kids with happy parents. Whether kids are reunited with biological families or adopted by foster parents, it is satisfying to give each of them the tools they need for a successful future.

What is one thing you would share with others about the work you do? It truly does take a village to raise a child. You find this out quickly in foster care when professionals and caring people join together to give a child a better life. It's hard work, but it's very much worth it.


Katherine Torres - Hampton Roads, VA


1. What made you decide to become a case manager and work with children in foster care? I have worked in Case Management for about 10 years and it is something I am absolutely passionate about. Case Management is a job that requires compassion, communication, time management, organization and problem-solving skills. These are all skills I am able to fully offer my foster families and children in care.

2. What is the most rewarding part of your job? The most rewarding part of my job is building a relationship with the children in care and foster parents, and being trusted to help support and guide them to make a difference in their lives.

3. What is one thing you would share with others about the work you do? Being a Treatment Foster Care Case Manager is not always an easy role, but yet always rewarding. The successes outweigh any misfortunes. As a TFC case manager, we do not aim to solve your problems, but rather heal through services and resources.



Michael Andrus - Fredericksburg, VA


1. What made you decide to become a case manager and work with children in foster care? Having worked with kids and families on the front end of the CPS process (doing CPS and Preventative CPS for a decade), I realized that I wanted to try to transition to working with kids and foster families. I want to help to rebuild and support those who have already come into care.

2. What is the most rewarding part of your job? Watching the growth in the children we work with and seeing an improvement in ability to cope with their traumatic histories. Most importantly, watching them live successfully.

3. What is one thing you would share with others about the work you do? There are never two days that are the same in this job.